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The importance of HHD (Home Hemodialysis)

MyDial

According to ERCPA, statistics taken in 2016 show 3.7 million patients worldwide were being treated for End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD). Of these, almost 3 million patients were undergoing dialysis treatment and around 750,000 had kidney transplants.

In Europe, in 2016 there were approximately 589,000 patients treated for ESRD, of which 358,000 were undergoing dialysis treatment and 231,000 received a kidney transplant.

As per the data provided by the National kidney foundation in 2016, around 500,000 patients received dialysis treatment in the US.

The limited availability of transplantable organs and the difficulties arising from incompatibility, mean that the most widespread treatment is dialysis.

FACILITIES CONSTRAINTS

Hemodialysis accounts for 89% of patients in dialysis therapy and it is carried out at public or private dialysis centres for 88% of cases (In-Centre Hemodialysis – HD) and only for 1% at home (Home Hemodialysis – HHD), unlike Peritoneal dialysis (PD) that is performed 100% at home.

The number of ESRD patients is increasing by around 6% per year due to diabetes, hypertension, and obesity and this number is anticipated to increase to 5.4 million by 2030.

Dialysis facilities are struggling and they may not be able to continue expanding due to financial constraints and lack of nursing staff and physicians.

HUMAN AND FINANCIAL COSTS

In-centre hemodialysis consists, on average, of 4-hour sessions performed three times a week (not counting transfers and organization).

Overall, the treatment is very expensive: in Europe, the annual cost of hemodialysis treatment in centre is € 21 billion, about €60,000/year per patient, which is equivalent to 2% of the healthcare budget; in the US, the annual cost of hemodialysis treatment in centre is $42 billion, about $89,000/year per patient.

This intensive and long-running treatment has huge economic and health effects on patients and their families: centres are frequently far from home, limiting the patient’s freedom of choice; patients are obliged to be accompanied by relatives, leading to significant loss of family income due to the time involved; the frequent transport of weakened patients can risk further health complications.

Faithful to its mission – to solve healthcare issues through the application of the reverse innovation principles – IBD has developed MyDial, a new portable hemodialysis system that works with an innovative, customized, and low-cost disposable and it has been designed to significantly reduce the economic impact of chronic dialysis treatment and make dehospitalization possible.